Search Page

Search Page

Disclaimer: IIEP cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information in these articles.
Hyperlinks to other websites imply neither responsibility for, nor approval of, the information contained in those other websites.

1-10 of 16 results

  • Newspaper

    Plagiarism cases surge 10% following the shift to remote learning

    Canada, France, Germany, India, Netherlands, UK

    - Education Technology

    A survey on plagiarism conducted by Copyleaks collected responses from 31,000 colleges and 20,000 high school students worldwide. The study shows that the largest increase in plagiarized submissions was recorded in the Netherlands, with 26% of cases before COVID compared to 45% after the pandemic, i.e. a total increase of 19%. This was followed by France (37% before vs. 49% after, i.e. - a 12% jump), closely followed by India (42% before vs. 53% after; i.e.- an 11% jump). The UK, Canada and Germany all saw a 4% increase in plagiarism cases.

  • Newspaper

    Largest ever research integrity survey flounders

    Netherlands

    - University World News

    The world's largest multi-disciplinary research integrity survey is at risk of failing to achieve its objectives with two-thirds of the institutions invited to collaborate having declined to participate because of the sensitivity of the subject and fear of negative publicity. As a result, the researchers who conducted the Dutch National Research Integrity Survey found themselves alone in scraping up many e-mail addresses and soliciting responses. They gathered feedback from less than 15% of the 40,000 targeted participants.

  • Newspaper

    Science fraud with Photoshop

    Netherlands

    Maxie Eckert, Sijn Cools - Standaard

    KU Leuven is currently investigating some 20 papers from the period 1999 to 2013 that would contain fraudulent images. Two papers have recently been withdrawn, one has been officially corrected. The investigation of the Committee for Academic Integrity is in a final phase. The articles that are under discussion come from the biomedical sciences. Three Leuven professors are a co-author of several indicated papers. In many cases, this was done in collaboration with colleagues from foreign institutions.

  • Newspaper

    Text recycling by Dutch researchers

    Netherlands

    Debora Weber-Wulff - Copy, Shake, Paste

    On September 24, 2017 the Dutch newspaper de Volkskrant reported on an investigation into self-plagiarism (zelfplagiaat) that was conducted by a Nijmengen research group. The sociologist of science and his PhD student analysed 922 publications by Dutch researchers from recent years. In economics, 14 % of the papers contained text from previous publications of the author(s), in psychology the figure was 5 %. They even found a duplicate article republished with just one small change, and two highly similar articles by the same author in the same issue of a journal. They also found that authors who publish more papers are more likely to reuse text.

  • Newspaper

    The Dutch fight for research integrity

    Netherlands

    David Matthews - Times Higher Education

    Every researcher in the Netherlands is to be questioned about whether they have committed research misconduct or engaged in “sloppy science” as part of a major national effort to bolster scientific standards. In response to rising concerns over a “reproducibility crisis” in science and a series of high-profile fraud cases in the Netherlands, the country is to commit 8 million euros ($9 million) to understanding the problem, finding solutions and trying to reproduce critical studies.

  • Newspaper

    We are the perfect gadflies: How youth can help to fight corruption in education

    Netherlands

    Frits Brouwer - Global Partnership for Education

    For Dutch Youth Representative for UNESCO, education has to come to the forefront of the development debate. He states that the implementation and effectiveness of many education programmes is hampered by corruption, and that young people can play a vital role in combatting this.

  • Newspaper

    Ministry changes rules on course inspections after diploma scandal

    Netherlands

    Robert Visscher - University World News

    Independent investigations into journalism diplomas awarded at Windesheim University have found that one in four students should not actually have been awarded one. In what is seen as one of the biggest failures of quality assurance in Netherlands higher education, two independent committees that looked into the work of all students who graduated in the past two years concluded that 86 out of 360 students should not have received a diploma.

Stay informed About Etico

Stay informed about related news with the monthly ETICO Bulletin

Submit your content

Help us grow our library by sharing your content on corruption in education.