In the media

In the media

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1-10 of 1728 results

  • Newspaper

    Vigilance unearths corruption in education dept’s section handling aided schools, actions mooted

    Malaysia

    Press

    - mathrubhumi.com

    Investigations carried out by the State Anti-Corruption and Vigilance Bureau have revealed cases of corruption within the offices of the Department of Education, particularly in relation to the appointment of teaching and non-teaching staff in government-aided public schools, the payment of subsidies for management purposes, the creation of new unauthorized posts, the fixing of salaries, retirement benefits and the granting of leave. Since 2018, management appointments for non-existent vacancies have been illegally validated. In addition, government-approved orders for posts in aided schools have been deliberately delayed due to non-payment of bribes.

  • Newspaper

    Libya: corruption scandal involving scholarships in Turkey

    Libya

    Press

    - Africa News

    The Libyan authorities announced on Thursday that they were opening investigations following an outcry over revelations of generous scholarships to study in Turkey for relatives of senior government officials. The beneficiaries of the scholarships had surprising profiles: a 74-year-old woman receiving a grant of more than 2,700 dollars a month to study computer science in Turkey and two brothers aged 57 and 70 accompanied by 10 and 15 members of their families at public expense. The lists include "1,895 scholarship holders" to whom a total of more than 14 million euros is paid each quarter.

  • Newspaper

    Pakistan’s education enigma

    Pakistan

    Press

    Ahmed Sultan - Daily Times

    The quality of education in Pakistan is extremely poor by world standards. Children study the same books as their parents did, or probably their grandparents. In Sindh, students who don't sit exams end up passing them. In Lahore, at the main examination centres located next to the board office, bribing and cheating are common practices. Professors are absent from classes and concentrate on maintaining their relations with influential individuals. Examination staff close the examination rooms to those who refuse to abide by the routine.

  • Newspaper

    Ministry gets tough on ‘problematic’ private universities

    Indonesia

    Press

    Kafil Yamin - University World News

    The Indonesian Ministry of Education and Culture has revoked 31 private higher education licences after finding that the institutions did not meet the required standards in terms of facilities and student numbers, that teaching was poor, and that there had been allegations of bogus courses and fraudulent issuing of diplomas. The Ministry will help students from the institutions concerned to transfer to accredited institutions. Teachers who are found not to have been involved in the fraudulent schemes will receive the same assistance, otherwise, they will be blacklisted.

  • Newspaper

    New research reveals 90% of UAE university students are confident they can get support and avoid plagiarism

    United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia

    Press

    - Zawya

    A survey of 1,054 students in the United Arab Emirates and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia found that 92% of students had some knowledge of academic integrity issues, from how to avoid plagiarism, to the consequences of cheating, to where to get help with references. The majority had heard about these issues from a member of the academic staff, showing a promising trend towards open communication within institutions about academic integrity. There were differences between male and female respondents, with male students being more aware of the workshops offered by their university while female students were more familiar with the concept of avoiding plagiarism. The survey also highlights the importance of academic integrity and provides useful information for educators.

  • Newspaper

    Corruption is a real brake on human capital development’

    Burkina Faso

    Press

    Wagdy Sawahe - University World News

    A study on the effect of corruption on human capital development through public investments revealed that corruption is a factor that hinders the development of human capital because it reduces educational expenditure as a percentage of gross domestic product and negatively influences investment in human capital, thus, contributing to reduced economic growth. "Education can take a real hit in an environment where politicians are corrupt. In a corrupt environment, skills are not put to envy (…) but, rather, individual relationships [are]”.

  • Newspaper

    Students must share responsibility for online exam integrity

    Kenya

    Press

    Gilbert Nakweya - University World News

    At a webinar organized by the University of Nairobi, a professor of curriculum and instruction at Texas Tech University challenged university faculty members to adopt innovative online assessment techniques that limit student cheating and implement academic integrity policies. Cheating can be limited by disabling certain functions, such as copy and paste, and by using software to prohibit access to certain applications, such as email, or to disable screen sharing. Systems whereby teachers are alerted when students attempt to cheat, and authentication can also help curb risks.

  • Newspaper

    The many – always deleterious – faces of credential fraud

    USA, Pakistan, Canada

    Press

    Nathan M Greenfield - University World News

    Fake Degrees and Fraudulent Credentials in Higher Education brings together contributions from authors in different fields and parts of the world, offering an overview of various aspects of academic fraud and highlighting the erosion of trust in academia and academics that systematically accompanies such cases. In the first chapter of the book on contract cheating and paper mills, we learn that the worldwide fake degree industry has grown from US$1 billion in 2015 to US$22 billion in 2022. Experts estimate that 4.7 billion people hold or have held fake diplomas.

  • Newspaper

    More private universities despite falling enrolment

    Bangladesh

    Press

    Mohiuddin Alamgir - University World News

    The government in Bangladesh is setting up more private universities even though the number of students and teachers at such higher education institutions has been dropping for the last four years. According to the University Grants Commission, private universities are failing to provide quality education, and, in some cases, they were set up without adequate planning as approval was allegedly obtained using political connections. Under the Private Universities Act, a university must own a permanent campus within seven years of its launch. 77 universities are over seven years old but only 26 have permanent campuses.

  • Newspaper

    California colleges are flooded with 'ghost students' attempting to steal financial aid

    USA

    Press

    Madeline Garfinkle - Entrepreneur

    According to the State Chancellor's Office, 20% of applications for California community colleges are fraudulent. A radiation oncologist at UC Davis is one of the thousands who have had their identity stolen to create fraudulent student applications with the intention to steal federal aid, a practice that has resulted in an unprecedented influx of ghost students. City College of San Francisco reported 59 fraudulent students and has identified 29 ghost students who have received $22,418 to date.

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