In the media

In the media

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1-10 of 1812 results

  • Video

    Corruption compromises ompromises quality of Zimbabwe's education

    Zimbabwe

    Video

    Nqobile Tshili - The Chronicle

    According to the Zimbabwe Anti-Corruption Commission, the widespread incidents of sextortion and academic fraud at the country's higher and tertiary learning institutions is a serious threat to the integrity of the degrees and diploma qualifications.

  • Video

    UAE cracks down in cheating

    UK

    Video

    Georgia Tolley - The Agenda

    Students who cheat in exams could now face fines of up to AED200,000.

  • Newspaper

    Paying school fees through e-citizen will curb corruption

    Kenya

    Press

    Moses Kinyanjui - Citizen Digital

    The former Secretary General of the Kenya National Union of Teachers (KNUT) has welcomed the Ministry of Education's decision to ask parents to pay school fees for students in national schools via the e-Citizen platform. This new government initiative aims to improve service delivery, bring transparency and protect both students and parents. However, some are expressing concern about the practical challenges and the country's state of readiness for such a digital transition

  • Newspaper

    India takes a stand against academic dishonesty: Anti-Cheating Bill

    India

    Press

    Dil Bar Irshad - BNN

    The Indian government has introduced the Anti-Cheating in Public Examinations Bill to combat rampant academic dishonesty and preserve the integrity of the education system. The Bill proposes strict measures such as increased surveillance, stricter rules for invigilators and severe penalties for cheating such as 10 years' imprisonment and a of ₹1 crore for those involved in exam malpractice. Additionally, the bill aims to establish a national technical committee to enhance exam security and fairness.

  • Newspaper

    The Chadian Anti-Corruption Organisation goes to war against corruption in Chadian schools

    Chad

    Press

    Tchad, Sabre Na-ideyam - TchadInfos

    The Chadian Anti-Corruption Organisation (OTAC) has launched an awareness-raising campaign to educate pupils and teachers about the importance of ethics and the fight against corruption in schools. Highlighting the importance of combating the consequences of corruption, including its influence on grades and harmful practices such as sexual favours, OTAC's national coordinator stressed the need to consider the gender dimension, encouraging the empowerment of girls and the promotion of equal opportunities.

  • Newspaper

    Ofsted inspectors ‘make up evidence’ about a school’s performance when IT fails

    UK

    Press

    Anna Fazackerley - The Guardian

    Ofsted inspectors are reportedly fabricating evidence due to frequent crashes in the electronic evidence gathering (EEG) system introduced in 2018. The Observer's investigation reveals anonymous claims that senior Ofsted leaders have known and covered these technical problems. Critics argue that inspections over the past five years should be invalidated if widespread evidence fabrication is true. Ofsted insists that judgments are backed by sufficient evidence, but the Observer found evidence of potential issues in Ofsted's written response to a school's complaint about missing evidence.

  • Newspaper

    The situation has become appalling’: fake scientific papers push research credibility to crisis point

    Ukraine

    Press

    Robin McKie - The Guardian

    A global surge in fraudulent research papers, exceeding 10,000 retractions last year, has become an international scandal. Originating in China, the issue has spread to other regions, with "paper mills" producing fabricated studies. Bribes to editors and infiltration of fraudulent agents exacerbate the problem. Major publishers are taking action, but financial incentives for researchers to publish persist. The escalating prevalence of sham science is eroding the foundation of trustworthy scientific knowledge, prompting calls for systematic solutions to address this growing threat to the integrity of research.

  • Newspaper

    Education dept accused of clandestine dealings

    Pakistan

    Press

    Safdar Rizvi - The Express Tribune

    In the last three years, corruption suspicions in the Sindh School Education Department prompted investigations by the National Accountability Bureau (NAB) and the FIA's anti-corruption wing. Issues include overpriced biometric machines, questionable contracts, and undisclosed transactions. A two-member inquiry board is looking into complaints from professors. Cases of corruption in the college education department, including funds for activities like digital libraries and teacher training, remain unresolved.

  • Newspaper

    New initiative to combat fraud in education: European observatory on the horizon

    France

    Press

    ETINED - Council of Europe

    The Bureau of the Council of Europe's Steering Committee for Education is discussing the creation of a European observatory for ethical integrity and transparency in Higher Education, a landmark initiative against educational fraud. The observatory aims to tackle the growing problem of fake diplomas with objectives such as data collection, promotion of ethical practices, prevention of corruption and international cooperation. Despite bureaucratic, financial and legal challenges, this initiative offers considerable potential benefits for the quality and reputation of higher education in Europe.

  • Newspaper

    Universities agree to settle in admissions collusion suit

    USA

    Press

    CNN - University World News

    Five universities in the United States agreed to settle a lawsuit accusing them of colluding on financial aid and admissions violations, according to new court filings. Yale, Columbia, Duke, Brown and Emory universities will pay a combined US$104.5 million to settle their portions of the case, which was brought by five former students against more than a dozen schools. The suit alleges the universities violated antitrust law when they ignored their pledge to not weigh a student’s ability to pay tuition fees when considering whether or not to accept, a practice referred to as ‘need-blind’ admission.

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