In the media

In the media

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21-30 of 1879 results

  • Newspaper

    Exam cheats surge due to mobile phones

    UK

    Press

    Rebecca Smithers - The Guardian

    Exam boards report a sharp rise in teenagers caught cheating in public exams. More than 2,500 lost marks for breaking the rules in last year's GCSEs and A-levels - a 9% increase on 2003. More than 900 pupils were caught cheating or plagiarising their coursework. In total, 1,013 penalties were triggered by inappropriate use of mobile phones - 16% up on the same time last year.

  • Newspaper

    Essays-for-sale: a growth area

    UK

    Press

    Hugh Levinson - BBC News

    More and more students are plagiarising material - and buying essays online. According to one of several companies that trade in "off-the-peg" and custom-written academic work, they sell between 500 and 1,000 essays a week, mainly to overseas students studying in the UK. Prices start at £50.

  • Newspaper

    Student cheats "buy eBay success"

    UK

    Press

    Rebecca Smithers - The Guardian

    Popular web-based auction sites such as eBay could be contributing to the spiralling number of plagiarism cases occurring at British universities. Increasing numbers of students are turning to commercial sales sites to both buy and sell dissertations and essays on the web. Powerpoint presentations and slides have emerged as the newest form of work to attract buyers on the internet.

  • Newspaper

    Anti-fraud technology to mark Scottish diplomas

    UK

    Press

    - World Education News & Reviews

    The Scottish Qualifications Authority will use sophisticated printing measures to combat diploma fraud. Results will be printed on heavy parchment paper containing secret markings known only to the printer and the awards body, making forgery more difficult. The British university admissions service admitted in 2004 that it had stopped 1,000 students from entering programs due to applications with fake qualifications.

  • Newspaper

    Scottish authorities suspend HND program after student fraud accusations

    UK

    Press

    - World Education News & Reviews

    Plans by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) to export its examinations system to China have been put on hold following charges of fraud by students looking to gain entry to Britain on study visas. Staff at a Sino-British college, Sea Rich, raised concerns that many students were not studying, but had been promised by the university a two-year-year HND for payments of US$2,200. The students had also been promised assistance by the university to get UK entry clearance.

  • Newspaper

    Confronting corruption: Ukrainian private higher education

    Ukraine

    Press

    J. Stetar, O. Panych and B. Cheng - Center for International Higher Education

    In spring 2004 interviews were conducted with 43 rectors, vice rectors, and administrators at five private universities. A consensus emerged that successful licensing or accreditation applications, with few exceptions, required some form of bribery. Licensing might require a bribe of US$ 200 about two months' salary for a typical academic - while accreditation might call for a 10 or 20 times greater "gratuity."

  • Newspaper

    Yushchenko pledges to fight corruption

    Ukraine

    Press

    Natasha Lisova - Associated Press

    Ukrainian university students can earn a passing grade two ways: by slogging through the books or by paying a $20 bribe. Yushchenko has decided to change this situation but the task won't be easy.

  • Newspaper

    Auditor for schools in Roslyn is charged

    USA

    Press

    Janon Fisher - The New York Times

    An auditor has been charged for having changed business records in an effort to help conceal the theft of more than $11 million. The district superintendent is accused of stealing more than $2 million; the assistant superintendent for $4 million and a former school accounting clerk for $780,000. Money shall have been used on artwork, jewellery, foreign trips and home mortgages. The scandal that has resulted in a state-wide changes in the way school finances are audited.

  • Newspaper

    Oregon revises law on non-accredited degrees

    USA

    Press

    - The Associated Press/ World Education News & Reviews

    Oregon lawmakers have passed a bill requiring those seeking employment in the state to add a disclaimer on their résumé to any qualifications not issued by an institution of higher education accredited by a state recognized accrediting agency. This is part of an on-going struggle by state legislators against institutions of education where academic standards are insufficient or non-existent. The Office of Degree Authorization lists on its Web site more than 300 institutions which is not recognized.

  • Newspaper

    A school loses accreditation

    USA

    Press

    - The Chronicle of Higher Education/ World Education News & Reviews

    Compton community college lost its accreditation from the Western Association of Schools and Colleges in June. The regional accrediting body cited poor governance, lack of education plans, lack of student support services, and an inadequate administrative staff as reasons for revoking the schools accreditation. The school is now being taken over by the state, despite California's highly decentralized system.

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