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1-10 of 59 results

  • Newspaper

    Same performance, better grades

    USA

    Aina Katsikas - The Atlantic

    It’s raining As in America’s higher education system, and not necessarily because students are particularly smart. In fact, many of them probably don’t deserve the high marks they’re getting. They have grade inflation to thank. That inflation is rapidly spreading to higher education institutions across the country. Despite stagnant academic performance, more students than ever before receive higher grades than they should.

  • Newspaper

    An admissions scandal shows how administrators’ ethics ‘fade’

    USA

    Peter Schmidt - The Chronicle of Higher Education

    A doctoral student in higher education at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, conducted a sociological research about corruption in higher education. Based on his examination of the 2009 Illinois admissions scandal, which centered on the university’s use of a separate, hidden admissions process to ease the entry of applicants with ties to politicians, donors, and university officials, his paper concludes that administrative misconduct frequently is "an organizational problem that demands organizational solutions."

  • Newspaper

    2 proposals for accreditation, 2 shared goals: limits and flexibility

    USA

    Eric Kelderman - The Chronicle of Higher Education

    Members of the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity discussed their latest set of proposals to overhaul the accreditation process and the way the committee assesses the accreditors. Soon after, the US Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions released a somewhat similar set of proposals in a white paper written by committee staff members.

  • Newspaper

    Corruption claim hits Rio University

    Brazil

    Donna Bowater - Times Higher Education

    Federal prosecutors are investigating an agreement between a Brazilian Federal University and a state-controlled oil company, which allegedly subcontracted tenured staff meant to work solely for the university via an academic foundation. However, after the investigation appeared to show widespread irregularities and fraud, higher education groups in Brazil have denied that there is insufficient transparency in the relationships between public universities and private companies.

  • Newspaper

    Stanford University investigates unusual amount of cheating allegations

    USA

    - The Huffington Post

    An unusually high number of students at Stanford University are suspected of cheating during the most recent term, putting faculty members and administrators of the prestigious institution on alert. University spokeswoman says that in the 2013-2014 academic year, 83 students violated the honor code. In the most recent term, the newspaper reported that one instructor believes that 20 percent of students in a large introductory course may have cheated.

  • Newspaper

    Fake diploma mills cost students real money

    USA

    Thomas Ahearn - Employment Screening Resources

    Phony diploma mills that use “slick websites” and claim to be “nationally accredited” to lure honest students looking to improve themselves through education only offer certificates costing hundreds of dollars that “are not worth the paper they are printed on”, according to a report from ABC Action News WFTS in Florida.

  • Newspaper

    Student-help site course Hero raises plagiarism, copyright concerns

    Canada

    Raffy Boudjikanian - CBC News

    Student plagiarism help site? Academics and administration officials at Concordia and McGill universities are raising concerns over Course Hero, a note-sharing website for students which boasts more than just notes. Looking at only a few of its hundreds of pages, CBC Montreal Investigates found 35 chapters lifted from textbooks, and 56 professors' presentations.

  • Newspaper

    The watchdogs of college education rarely bite

    USA

    Andrea Fuller ; Douglas Belkin - The Wall Street Journal

    Accreditors keep hundreds of schools with low graduation rates or high loan defaults alive. Most colleges can’t keep their doors open without an accreditor’s seal of approval, which is needed to get students access to federal loans and grants. But accreditors hardly ever kick out the worst-performing colleges and lack uniform standards for assessing graduation rates and loan defaults.

  • Newspaper

    Former Iowa State University Scientist sentenced to over 4 Years for Faking HIV vaccine results

    USA

    Vishakha Sonawane - International Business Times

    A former Iowa State University researcher who fabricated the results of an experimental HIV vaccine was sentenced to four years and nine months in prison recently. He was also ordered to pay US$7.2 million to the US National Institutes of Health that funded the research.

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