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1-10 of 425 results

  • Newspaper

    U. of New Zealand comes under attack

    New Zealand

    Press

    David Cohen - The Chronicle of Higher Education

    The president of New Zealand's largest postsecondary institution defended it last month against politicians who have accused it of widespread corruption. It is also suggested that the university is home to nepotism and fraudulent accounting.

  • Newspaper

    Expenditure tracking surveys can fight corruption

    Philippines

    Press

    Dennis Arroyo - MQ7Money

    Hace unos años, la corrupción en la educación pública era tan acusada que la ratio era de un libro de texto por cada cuatro niños. Hoy en día se están llevando a cabo varias reformas y agrupaciones municipales está siguiendo muy de cerca los manuales escolares.

  • Newspaper

    Audits hold institutions accountable

    Australia

    Press

    David Woodhouse - University World News

    In 1999, the Australian Federal Education Minister announced the establishment of the Australian Universities Quality Agency, or AUQA. AUQA has to audit universities as well as non-university institutions. There has been some criticism that AUQA "only looks at processes not outcomes" or that it "looks only at the processes intended to achieve quality and not at the quality itself". In 2006, AUQA commissioned an independent review of its activities.

  • Newspaper

    Bangladesh: watch for cheating universities

    Bangladesh

    Press

    - University World News

    The Bangladesh government has decided to warn students and their guardians of the fact that private universities' open outer campuses in the guise of regional resource centers, study centers, etc. The ministry has come to know that students who take admission in those unapproved local universities are frequently cheated. Actually, there are 51 private universities in Bangladesh which were run according to the Private University Act 1992, as amended in 1998.

  • Newspaper

    Children miss out on school because of corruption

    Cambodia

    Press

    - IRIN

    New teachers often face a many-month delay before they receive their salaries. Teachers sometimes supplement their income with a second job. This can affect their own attendance at school, and can put pressure on the amount of time they have to prepare their lessons. A 2007 report by the Cambodian NGO Education Partnership (NEP) reveals education costs for each child averaged $108 annually, or 9 percent of each family's annual income. "When you include informal and formal school costs, and private classes and snacks, many students are paying $2.50 every day," the education and capacity-building officer for the NGO Education Partnership (NEP), told IRIN. The inability to pay informal fees was the most common reason parents gave for their children dropping out, the report stated.

  • Newspaper

    Deregulation of higher education

    Indonesia

    Press

    David Jardine - University World News

    The Ministry of National Education of Indonesia proposed a bill to further deregulate the Nation's universities. But the privatization of leading universities will lead, according to the Indonesia Corruption Watch, to the exclusion of the children from less well-off families. The high costs of university entrance and passage in the way have indeed tended to either reduce or eliminate students from the poorer provinces of Indonesia. Major corruption cases break out in Indonesia on a regular basis and there is strong evidence that higher university tuition fees increased corruption in the sector.

  • Newspaper

    Education bill to improve safety and accountability in New Zealand

    New Zealand

    Press

    Chris Carter - United Nations Public Administration Network

    The Education Amendment Bill proposes the creation of an information matching programme which will allow the identification of teachers who are teaching without a current practicing certificate or authorization. In addition the Bill provides greater clarity to school boards of trustees on their roles, and increases flexibility around timing of board elections, the establishment of boards and alternative board constitutions.

  • Newspaper

    Universities asked to provide digital copy of each PhD thesis

    Pakistan

    Press

    - The Nation

    The Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan has asked all the universities of the country to provide a digital or computerised copy of the theses submitted by the students doing M Phil or PhD, so that it can upload all the theses on its website and an automatic check established. According to sources HEC have asked universities managements to warn postgraduate students that plagiarism would result in their degrees being cancelled. More than 5,000 people have been awarded PhD degree from various universities of the country out of which 1,000 have been uploaded on HEC website.

  • Newspaper

    Doors opening, doors slamming

    Turkmenistan

    Press

    Stefan Mitas - TOL

    Despite the promises of great reforms in education made by the new President, the Soviet system is still running. Many allege that the bureaucrats involved in the renovations of schools frequently sign dual contracts with foreign construction companies, deliberately designed to allow a huge portion of the reported contract costs to disappear. Moreover, bribes are still viewed as a secondary prerequisite for university admission after one's scores on standardized entrance examinations.

  • Newspaper

    Lessons in graft

    Uzbekistan

    Press

    Marina Kozlova - Transition On Line

    In Uzbekistan, many schools lack basic supplies and teachers sometimes resort to asking pupils for cash to supplement meager budgets. The Uzbek Uchitel Uzbekistana newspaper in August 2007 reported that even the most experienced elementary and secondary-school teachers earn less than $100 a month. In 2007, Transparency International ranked Uzbekistan fifth from bottom in its corruption index of 180 nations surveyed.

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