1-10 of 269 results

  • Newspaper

    Researcher admits faking data

    USA

    Press

    Doug Payne - The Scientist

    A well-known obesity researcher will plead guilty to making material false statements in a 1999 grant application worth $542,000 from the US National Institutes of Health. The researcher, who held various research positions at the University of Vermont (UVM) College of Medicine in Burlington could go to jail for up to 5 years.

  • Newspaper

    Student cheats "buy eBay success"

    UK

    Press

    Rebecca Smithers - The Guardian

    Popular web-based auction sites such as eBay could be contributing to the spiralling number of plagiarism cases occurring at British universities. Increasing numbers of students are turning to commercial sales sites to both buy and sell dissertations and essays on the web. Powerpoint presentations and slides have emerged as the newest form of work to attract buyers on the internet.

  • Newspaper

    Science and fraud, guilty connection

    France

    Press

    Pierre Le Hir - Le Monde / Direct matin

    The ministry of Higher education and research entrusted to the national Centre of scientific research (CNRS) a mission on scientific integrity. Scientific fraud is varied: biased manufacturing or forgery of results, biased interpretation or selection of data, alteration of curves or images, plagiarism, theft of ideas, financial profit-sharing's ... The increasing pressure which practices on the researchers (among which the career and the credits depend strictly on the quantity of articles and on produced results) tend to multiply the fraudulent practices.

  • Newspaper

    A software against the scientific plagiarism

    France

    Press

    Pierre Le Hir - Le Monde / Direct matin

    An investigation published by Nature, reveals that a scientific plagiarism has course among researchers too. Two researchers from South-western Medical Centre of the University of Texas, Mounir Errami and Harold Garner, auscultated an American medical documentation base, Medline, where summaries of 17 million articles published in more than 5,000 reviews from some 80 countries are indexed. They screened it through an engine search, eTBLAST, which is able to locate the "similarities". While focusing on the most quoted 7 million articles, they located a little more than 70,000 cases of "high resemblance". That which, taking into account the limits of the software, makes them estimate the number of plagiarisms at more than 200,000, out of the 17 million referred articles.

  • Newspaper

    Training for scholarly integrity

    USA

    Press

    Stuart Heiser - University World News

    This was the second annual Strategic Leaders Global Summit sponsored by the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS). Last year's meeting in Banff in Canada resulted in the "Banff Principles" to broadly guide international collaboration in graduate education; this year's summit focused on "best practices" specific to promoting scholarly integrity. Leaders in higher education agreed on issues and actions that have to lead to strengthen scholarly integrity because of the growing globalization of graduate education and research, and discussed on "best practices" to promote scholarly integrity.

  • Newspaper

    Australian code for the responsible conduct of research

    Australia

    Press

    - NHMRC

    The Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and Universities Australia have launched a revision version of a Code for Responsible Research. The purpose of the Code is to guide institutions and researchers in responsible research practices. It embraces topics such as managing data and materials; publication and dissemination of findings; attribution; peer review processes and conflict of interest.

  • Newspaper

    Wanted: PhDs -- without laptops

    South Africa

    Press

    - Mail and Guardian

    In their race to lure more postgraduate students, some universities are stopping just short of offering students a free semester to Jamaica where they can sip cocktails and finish up their research thesis. Postgraduate students are cash cows because they bring with them high government subsidies, more than for undergraduates.

  • Newspaper

    University sacks prof who was 3 times a fake

    China

    Press

    Xu Chi - Shanghai Daily

    A Chinese Professor has been fired by his university and disqualified from China's Recruitment Program of Global Experts for copying his resume and academic articles from three other academics with the same name. The 39 year-old professor with the Beijing University of Chemical Technology has admitted falsifying his educational background, work experience and published articles by copying the details from overseas professors.

  • Newspaper

    Professor shown to be a fraud

    China

    Press

    Luo Wangshu - China Daily

    A man assumed the academic identity of a Yale University assistant professor who has the same name as him for several months. The person joined Beijing University of Chemical Technology as a professor in November. His resume listed seven articles published by top English-language academic journals, but the articles were the work of an assistant professor at Yale University.

  • Newspaper

    Abuse of student internships "not fully revealed" by investigation

    China, Taiwan China, Hong Kong China

    Press

    Mimi Leung - University World News

    Students and academics from China, Taiwan and Hong Kong researching the working conditions of student interns at factories in China have said that an officially agreed investigation into working conditions at Foxconn factories, which produce Apple iPads, did not provide a "full picture" of the extent of abuse of the internship system.

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