1-10 of 428 results

  • Newspaper

    Dept. of Education launches new web site to combat diploma mills

    USA

    Press

    - World Education News & Reviews

    The Department of Education has launched a website which features a list of 6,900 academic institutions accredited by an accrediting agency or state approval agency. The website is designed to help employers distinguish between accredited institutions of higher education and unaccredited institutions commonly as "diploma mills" that offer bogus degrees.

  • Newspaper

    Former coach indicted on fraud charges for providing phony academic credits to basketball players

    USA

    Press

    Welch Suggs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

    A federal grand jury in Kansas indicted a former college-basketball coach last month on charges that he arranged for his players to receive phony academic credit and stole $120,000 in Pell Grants. The former coach faces a total of 51 years in prison and over $1.5-million in fines if found guilty of all counts.

  • Newspaper

    There are no special exam centres – WAEC

    Ghana, Nigeria

    Press

    Tony Edike - Vanguard

    The West African Examinations Council says it has not recorded any case of examination leakage in five years. It also denied knowledge of the existence of "special exam centers". The centers were allegedly created by some principals and secondary school proprietors for their candidates who are compelled to pay fees higher than the official fees charged by WAEC. The money is reportedly used for lobbying officials of the council to release the examination question papers to the centers ahead of the official time of the examination.

  • Newspaper

    Parents to blame for leakages

    Zambia

    Press

    - The Times of Zambia

    The Secondary School Teachers Union of Zambia (SESTUZ) has blamed parents for rampant examination malpractices. Parents are actually in the fore-front organising and buying leaked examination papers for their children. According to SESTUZ the government needed to build more schools because the population of Zambia had increased drastically while the number of schools remained static.

  • Newspaper

    Council to set standards for education in EA states

    Kenya, Uganda

    Press

    Allan Kisia - The Standard

    Le Conseil interuniversitaire de l'Afrique de l'Est (IUCEA) est sur le point de développer un système destiné à normaliser les diplômes proposés par les universités locales. Selon le secrétaire de direction du Conseil, la plupart des Kényans souhaitent intégrer une université en Ouganda du fait de coûts d'inscription inférieurs à ceux de leurs universités locales. Cependant, ils ne s'assurent pas de la conformité de la qualité de l'enseignement dispensé par les universités ougandaises aux normes en vigueur.

  • Newspaper

    Kabale sacks 280 teachers

    Uganda

    Press

    Darious Magara - New Visions

    KABALE district has sacked 280 primary school teachers who were either on trial or untrained and recruited 240 to replace them. The 280 teachers had been appointed last year when the department had a shortage of teachers. The education sector is now carrying out a massive exercise to get rid of teachers with fake or forged papers.

  • Newspaper

    PLE poor results blamed on teachers

    Uganda

    Press

    Fred Muzaale - The Monitor

    Poor performance in the 2004 Primary leaving Examinations has been blamed on the many teachers who used fake academic documents and poor sanitation in numerous schools. Of the 5,655 pupils who sat for PLE last year, only 90 passed in grade one, while 3,892 failed.

  • Newspaper

    Mpigi names 120 fake teachers

    Uganda

    Press

    Robert Mwanie - The Monitor

    120 teachers have no qualifications, i.e. no documents or inadequate ones. Many primary teachers in remote areas lack qualifications and some do not even have O' level certificates.

  • Newspaper

    Crackdown urged on web exam plagiarism

    UK

    Press

    Rebecca Smithers - The Guardian

    The government urges that exam papers should be scanned by specialist computer software as part of a crackdown on internet plagiarism by A-level and GSCE pupils in their compulsory coursework. The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority warns that exam boards appear to be failing to spot cheating, even though the number of cases of fraud is increasing. Last year 3,600 teenagers were caught breaching the rules, a 9 % rise on the previous year.

  • Newspaper

    Exam cheats surge due to mobile phones

    UK

    Press

    Rebecca Smithers - The Guardian

    Exam boards report a sharp rise in teenagers caught cheating in public exams. More than 2,500 lost marks for breaking the rules in last year's GCSEs and A-levels - a 9% increase on 2003. More than 900 pupils were caught cheating or plagiarising their coursework. In total, 1,013 penalties were triggered by inappropriate use of mobile phones - 16% up on the same time last year.

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