In the media

In the media

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1781-1790 of 1812 results

  • Newspaper

    Who ate up their biscuits: PIUL in HC starts search

    India

    Press

    - The Indian Express

    A petition has been sent to the Indian authorities pointing out that more than 5 lakh of primary school students in West Delhi have had no school lunch for two months; it denounces an inappropriate use of public resources.

  • Newspaper

    Indians pay a whopping Rs 26,728 cr as bribes: Study

    India

    Press

    - Hindustan Times

    A survey undertaken by Transparency International revealed that the education sector is heavily affected by corruption, being at least the third most corrupt public service. It is proposed that citizens' charters be prepared for improving public servants' accountability.

  • Newspaper

    The fine art of fighting fakery

    Press

    Katherine S. Mangan - Chronicle of Higher Education

    Higher-education authorities in Britain, China, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United States have sounded the alarm about the increase in incidents of attempted admissions fraud. Authorities say cases of fraud typically involve students from developing countries who are desperate to get degrees from universities in developed countries, including those in Western Europe and the United States. A handful of countries seem to have the most offenders, including China, Colombia, Iraq, Nigeria and several former Soviet republics, particularly Armenia.

  • Newspaper

    Education Department seeks to ease rules on student aid

    USA

    Press

    Anne Marie Borrego, Stephen Burd and Dan Carnevalle - Chronicle of Higher Education

    The U.S. Education Department last week proposed new rules that would loosen a ban on incentive compensation for college recruiters and get rid of a financial-aid regulation. The proposal to eliminate the 12-hour rule follows years of debate. Distance-education providers have pushed the department and Congress to throw out the regulation, but others have cited fears that relaxing the rule would lead to fraud.

  • Newspaper

    In India, Suitcases of Money Buy Admission to College

    India

    Press

    Martha Ann Overland - Chronicle of Higher Education

    Fees for manipulating entrance test scores are between $80 to $20 000 for the most popular programs, such as computer science, medicine or engineering. Many feel the only way to clean up the system is to expand educational opportunities.

  • Newspaper

    Corruption plagues academe around the world

    Japan, Kenya, Mexico, UK, USA

    Press

    - Chronicle of Higher Education

    Japan. Kenya. Mexico. United Kingdom. USA: People from the Kenyan Ministry of Education participated in selling fake diplomas. In the USA and Mexico, students buy term papers and admissions essays online. People propose to take tests for others in China.

  • Newspaper

    In China, Bribery and Fakery Lower the Value of Degrees

    China

    Press

    - Chronicle of Higher Education

    Corruption in admissions procedure, the sitting of exams and the allocation of scholarships is rampant in Chinese universities. One positive outcome of a recent plagiarism scandal is the design of a code of conduct for students and professors by Beijing's University.

  • Newspaper

    In Colombia, Decades of Graft Cripple a University

    Colombia

    Press

    Michael Easterbrook - Chronicle of Higher Education

    Politicians obliged universities to hire friends in return for help in ensuring a steady flow of funds. By forging documents and bribing appropriate officials, university staff secure larger retirement checks than they are entitled to and retire before the customary age.

  • Newspaper

    In Georgia, Professors Hand Out Price Lists

    Georgia

    Press

    Bryon Mac Williams - Chronicle of Higher Education

    Admissions, courses, grades and diplomas are for sale in high profile higher institutions. Admissions officers offer expensive private lessons. Reforms should include an accreditation system, an entrance exam and an increase in financing.

  • Newspaper

    India's higher education watchdog

    India

    Press

    Martha Ann Overland - Chronicle of Higher Education

    In 1998, the education watchdog group from Bombay, the Forum for Fairness in Education, won a landmark case that clamped down on secretive admissions practices. The court ruled that all colleges and universities must make entrance-examination scores public, to ensure that admissions are based on merit, and not money passed under the table.

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