In the media

In the media

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1691-1700 of 1909 results

  • Newspaper

    Nurse practitioner from Greenburgh accused of pocketing millions in loan fraud scheme

    USA

    Press

    Jonathan Bandler - Lohud

    The US Attorney’s Office arrested a nurse practitioner on federal charges of wire fraud, financial aid fraud and aggravated identity theft. She used doctors’ pedigree information and forged signatures to certify disability diagnoses that got more than $10.5 million in loans discharged for at least 125 people. She defrauded the federal Department of Education's Total and Permanent Disability discharge program, which relieves the student loans of those who suffer from permanent physical or mental disabilities.

  • Newspaper

    Students accuse lecturers of cash-for-marks demands

    Zimbabwe

    Press

    TellZim News - University World News

    Students at Masvingo Teachers’ College claim that lecturers in the Professional Studies Syllabus and Art Professional Syllabus demand US$10 for students to pass their assignments. If they refuse to meet their demands, the teachers deliberately cause them to fail their assignments or give them lower grades. According to the headmaster of the college, the matter is under investigation.

  • Newspaper

    Stealing other people’s writing just got harder

    France, Netherlands, India

    Press

    Brian Blum - Isreael21c

    A survey of 51,000 college and high school students reveals that the average percentage of plagiarism before and after Covid increased from 26% to 45% in the Netherlands, from 37% to 49% in France and from 42% to 53% in India. The new anti-plagiarism software CopyLeaks uses Artificial Intelligence to detect plagiarism and copyright infringement. CopyLeaks can be used as a site license purchased by a school, institution, or publication, by individual writers who pay based on the number of words and pages checked.

  • Newspaper

    Prison sentences for fraudsters who swindled students

    Algeria

    Press

    Azzeddine Bensouiah - University World News

    The Director of the Future Gate Agency was sentenced to seven years in prison and fined 7 million dinars (about $50,000) after 75 Algerian students who wanted to enrol in foreign universities, including in Ukraine, Turkey, and Russia, fell victim to fraud. Although they paid the Agency large sums of money, the accommodation conditions were wretched, and their university applications forged. Two of their assistants and three influencers, prosecuted in the same case, were given one year in prison and fined 100,000 dinars (about $700) each.

  • Newspaper

    Intelligence sharing: updated cheating website database

    Australia

    Press

    TEQSA - TEQSA

    TEQSA’s Higher Education Integrity Unit has updated a database of 2,333 suspected commercial academic cheating service websites, including 579 sites specifically targeting students at Australian Higher Education institutions. This intelligence sharing will enable providers to block access to these websites from their institutional networks and is part of TEQSA’s ongoing partnership with the Higher Education sector to strengthen cultures of academic integrity.

  • Newspaper

    Experts develop educational programmes on the fight against corruption

    Côte d'Ivoire

    Press

    Elvis Gouza - Linfodrome.ci

    Several pedagogical experts took part in a workshop in June 2022 to develop educational programmes on the fight against corruption and good governance organised by the High Authority for Good Governance. The project aims to instil integrity, transparency, and accountability in learners from preschool to higher education, including secondary schools and training schools for public officials.

  • Newspaper

    Ernst & Young cheating scandal: the ‘largest fine ever imposed’ against audit company

    USA

    Press

    Collin Leonard - Deseret News

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has charged the accounting firm, Ernst & Young, with cheating on ethics exams for Certified Public Accountant licensing and lying about it to investigators. Along with the $100 million fine, the firm will have to undertake extensive remedial measures to fix the firm’s ethical issues. Auditors say that SEC is investigating three other large public accounting firms for conflicts of interest.

  • Newspaper

    EACC Warns Holders of Fake University Degrees of Dire Consequences

    Kenya

    Press

    Capital FM - All Africa

    The Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC) is investigating dozens of cases involving politicians, State and public officers over forged degrees, illegal allocation of resources, irregular employment, and approval of suspected pending bills. According to EACC’s chief executive officer, money and assets will be recovered from politicians who used forged academic certificates to win elective posts, even from those who retired.

  • Newspaper

    Corruption in national university entrance exams rocks Iran

    Iran, Islamic Republic

    Press

    Maryam Sinaee - Iran International

    Questions and answers for the annual university entrance exams Concours have been sold in exchange for $10,000-20,000 to secure placement at top universities. Telegram’s social media channel published the test questions half an hour after the exam started, as evidence of their leakage. But according to the head of the Ministry of Higher Education's assessment organisation, 480 participants who had tried to use digital equipment to receive answers to the test questions from outside have been arrested.

  • Newspaper

    Scams: when trust takes a back seat

    Bangladesh

    Press

    Mohiuddin Alamgir, Mahbubur Rahman Khan - The Daily Star

    The Anti-Corruption Commission has charged five members and an executive director of the North South University (NSU) board of governors with abuse of power, increasing their allowances to ten times the approved rate, and buying luxury cars at the expense of students. For more than a decade, NSU has offered several Bachelor of Business Administration programmes without University Grants Commission approval. According to an investigator, NSU was allowed to enrol 50 students in approved BBA programmes, but it enrolled about 2,700 students in one semester.

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